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Holidays Can Be Happy and Healthy with Diabetes

Between the crowds, the social obligations, and the endless to-do lists, your usual routine for controlling your diabetes can get off track amid the holiday rush.

How to cope? This year, have a plan to stay healthy.

Party Healthy

One of the biggest challenges this time of year is the starring role food and eating play in many celebrations. Before you head off to the neighbor’s open house, have a healthy snack. This will help you eat less party food. Find out what you can about what will be served, and bring a snack or side dish to share—one that just happens to fit your nutritional needs.

Rather than skipping all your holiday favorites, see what can fit into your meal plan and choose small portions. Look for turkey without gravy, and side dishes that go easy on the butter and cheese. Fruit is another good option.

Watch the drinks

When it comes to drinks, sparkling water, unsweetened tea and diet sodas are good choices. Even if your doctor says alcohol is safe for you, don’t overdo it. Club soda can be mixed with dry wine for a low-alcohol, low-sugar wine cooler. Remember that it’s best for men to drink no more than two drinks a day and women just one—and always with food. Read about diabetes and alcohol consumption here to learn more.

Focus on People

Rather than risk temptation, move away from the food at parties, and turn your attention to everyone around you. Suggest activities to take the place of food this season, whether it’s taking a group walk after a big meal, building a snowman, or dancing.

Bedtime Check

Before you hit the sack after all the festivities, be sure to remember one final check: your blood sugar. If it’s dipped too low, you may need a healthy snack.

Be sure to talk to your Rite Aid Pharmacist about your diabetes management plan for this holiday season.



     Alcohol. American Diabetes Association.

     What I Need to Know About Eating and Diabetes. National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Disease, National Institutes of Health.

     “Managing Diabetes During the Holidays,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.