How to Banish Winter Chapped Lips (and Other Lip Care Woes)

Post Date: January 2018  |  Category: Beauty Skin Care

Image of smiling woman outside

Give winter chapped lips a kiss goodbye!

With the arrival of colder weather and the bustle of the upcoming holiday season, your winter beauty routine is probably on your mind. You might choose a more hydrating nighttime serum or a stronger daytime SPF game, but your lips sometimes go without the TLC they desperately need. That is, of course, until a day on the slopes or a windy weekend leaves them dry, chapped, and crying out for moisture. It gets worse—winter chapped lips are painfully obvious when you try to use lipstick, which means missing out on that perfect winter color. Don't worry; smooth, hydrated lips only require a few extra minutes in your daily routine. With these tips, your winter won't be ruined by sore, dry lips.

Choosing a Balm

Confused by the rows upon rows of lip products? The best way to choose a lip balm is to ignore all of the pretty packaging and look instead at the ingredients. A good balm will have a super-hydrating base, such as glycerin, mineral oil, lanolin, or aloe. If a hydrating ingredient is one of the first listed then you're off to a great start. There are a few other ingredients and factors you might want to consider when choosing a balm:

  • Sun protection. You protect your skin in the summer, but winter rays can do just as much damage as the summer sun. Look for sun protection in the form of SPF of 15 or greater.
  • Active ingredients. If your lips are extremely chapped, choose a medicated lip balm like Blistex Medicated Lip Ointment. Medicated lip balms usually contain active ingredients such as dimethicone (which helps to increase skin lubrication), as well as camphor and menthol, both of which are used to reduce irritation and relieve pain.
  • Formula. If you're spending a lot of time outside, it's best to choose a lip product that can be applied and reapplied easily. Choose something that's easy to pop into a purse or pocket. Remember that liquid formulas might become thicker or harder to apply in the cold, so a stick application might be a better bet during the winter.

Caring for Your Lips

One common question about lip care is whether or not it's safe and effective to exfoliate. The good news is that like the skin on the rest of your body, your lips benefit from dry skin removal—as long as it's done properly. Because lip skin is so thin, you don't need to be as vigorous or abrasive as you might be on other areas.

The best way to exfoliate lips is with a gentle circular motion. Skip the harsh scrubs and opt for a damp Daylogic Facial Sponge to gentle remove flaky skin. Rinse with warm water and apply a moisturizing lip balm to help protect the newly revealed skin. Avoid exfoliating if the skin on your lips is broken and bleeding and limit your routine to once per week for the best results.

Winter Colors

Winter chapped skin is particularly unfortunate because dry, flaky lips make it difficult to wear a lip color. The lipstick or gloss can settle into dry lines, flake off, and wear away prematurely. You might be tempted to reach for a long-wear product to combat the effects of winter lips, but that could make the issue even worse. Longwear formulas contain ingredients that can dry lips out, so the winter months are the perfect time to test drive a creamier formula.

Opt for a balm-like lipstick, like Neutrogena MoistureSmooth, or a moisturizing lipstick in a gorgeous, rich color, like Revlon Kiss Lip Balm in Strawberry. Want a lower maintenance winter color? The light glow and natural ingredients in Burt's Bees Lip Shimmer provide subtle color and all-day moisture.

Don't resign yourself to another winter of dry, dull lips. You upgrade your skin care and makeup routine to account for colder weather—why not update your lip care as well? By giving your pout the protection, moisture, and care it needs, you can kiss winter chapped lips goodbye once and for all.

 

Sources:

Daily Med, Blistex Medicated Mint Lip Balm

WebMD, How to Get Beautiful Lips


These articles are not a substitute for medical advice, and are not intended to treat or cure any disease. Advances in medicine may cause this information to become outdated, invalid, or subject to debate. Professional opinions and interpretations of scientific literature may vary. Consult your healthcare professional before making changes to your diet, exercise, or medication regime.