How to Save on Cold and Flu Medicine

Post Date: September 2017  |  Category: Health Tips Immunizations Medicine Pharmacy

Woman with a cold blowing her nose.

Prevention is one of the best ways to save money on cold and flu medicine this season. Don't forget to visit your local Rite Aid for your annual flu shot.

The sniffles and chills are hard enough to deal with—so don't let cold and flu season burn a hole in your wallet. Rite Aid is your one-stop shop when it comes to saving money on cold and flu medicine. Here's what you need to know:

Shop Smarter

We're all guilty of waiting until we're sick to look and see what we have in the medicine cabinet, only to discover that what we need isn't there. Just like a fridge, your medicine cabinet needs to be cleaned and stocked periodically. Medicines expire, things get used and not replaced, and let's face it—no one really wants to run to the store when they have the flu.

Stay ahead of the game this season and shop smarter. One of the easiest ways to do this is to regularly read your local Rite Aid circular and keep an eye out for deals on your favorite (or most used) items. You may not have a cold when you buy them, but having Hall's Honey Lemon Cough Drops and a new bottle of Robitussin Peak Cold Cough and Chest Congestion DM will really come in handy when you get that "thing going around the office."

Another way to stretch your dollar is to buy in bulk. Single-dose packets of headache medicine or those tiny travel-size tissues are great in a pinch, but it's not cost effective if you end up buying them all the time. If it's something with a long shelf life, like Puffs Facial Tissues or Advil Liqui-Gels Pain Reliever, don't hesitate to stock up. You'll spend more money upfront but save throughout the season.

Stay Healthy

Staying healthy is easier said than done, and the truth is, there is no guaranteed way to not get sick this season. But, there are some preventative measures you can take to help bolster your immune system and lessen your risk of coming down with something.

First and foremost, don't forget to get your flu shot. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that everyone six years of age and older get vaccinated each year because the seasonal flu vaccine is created specifically to protect against the strain of flu that is expected to be most common in the upcoming season. Flu shots are available without an appointment at your local Rite Aid, and this crucial vaccination is free with most insurance plans, although there may be age restrictions in certain states.

One of the best ways to boost your immune system is by avoiding stress. According to the American Psychological Association, stress wreaks havoc on your body's ability to fight back. Taking breaks at work, going for a brisk walk, or talking to a friend are simple ways to help you manage your stress levels and relax. Even small changes like reframing the way you approach a tough situation can have a positive impact on your health.

Cleaning surfaces you often come into contact with can help, too, both at home and at work. Look for a product that cleans and disinfects, like Rite Aid Home Wipes, and read the label to ensure it kills the flu virus. Then get working on the usual suspects, such as doorknobs, faucets, tv remotes, and your computer mouse.

Talk to a Pharmacist

Rite Aid offers a free consultation with a pharmacist that can help you save money and avoid dangerous drug interactions. Whenever you're sick, you can come in and speak with a qualified pharmacist about your symptoms. They can help you choose the medicine you need so you're not spending extra money on anything you don't.

The cost of cold and flu medicine can add up pretty quickly. Use these tips and shop at Rite Aid to help you stay healthy and save money this season.

By Rebecca Desfosse

 

Sources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, How to Clean and Disinfect Schools to Help Slow the Spread of Flu

Harvard Health Publications, How to Boost Your Immune System

American Psychological Association, Stress Weakens the Immune System


These articles are not a substitute for medical advice, and are not intended to treat or cure any disease. Advances in medicine may cause this information to become outdated, invalid, or subject to debate. Professional opinions and interpretations of scientific literature may vary. Consult your healthcare professional before making changes to your diet, exercise, or medication regime.